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Monterey Bay Aquarium

Bio 🌊 Dive into the wonders of the sea and our mission to conserve the ocean! 🐙 montereybayaquarium.org 🐟 @SeafoodWatch 👻 montereyaq

Website http://mbayaq.co/2okHCEo

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San Carlos Beach Report Download 14 3.86K

Siphonophores float like a sea butterfly and sting like a bee-OUTCH! These gelatinous attack ropes of colonial animals are some of the top predators in the midwater, and occasionally whip by the coast as this Rosacea siphonophore did along Cannery Row and caught by @hiimjoe88! Siphonophores are a variation on the theme of the typical hydrozoan modus operandi: "What if I could be a stinging predator, and bring my clones along for the ride?" You've probably heard of one siphonophore: the Portuguese man o' war, with its gas-filled sail! One of the most famous jellies in the sea, the man o' war sails on the sea surface with a gas-filled float. While you may not find man o' wars in Monterey, we sometimes get our own hydrozoan gelatinous sailors washing up with the wind—Velella velella! They're not siphonophores, but we wanted to get these out there before we wrap up . Thanks for reading along about the incredible gelata in the Monterey Bay everyone!

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image by Monterey Bay Aquarium (@montereybayaquarium) with caption : "There’s no straw in this photo—because we skipped it! Small actions like avoiding single-use plastic straws helps make t" - 1721384638205602364
Report Download 20 6.36K

There’s no straw in this photo—because we skipped it! Small actions like avoiding single-use plastic straws helps make the ocean cleaner for sea turtles and everything else that depends on it, including humans!

Instagram Image by Monterey Bay Aquarium (@montereybayaquarium) with caption : "IT CAME FROM INNER SPACE! An alien hovercraft floats through Monterey Bay, its red eyes scanning and stinging tentacles " at Pacific Grove, California - 1721336412576288882

IT CAME FROM INNER SPACE! An alien hovercraft floats through Monterey Bay, its red eyes scanning and stinging tentacles deployed like a tractor beam to abduct hapless plankton. The hydrozoan bell jelly Scrippsia pacifica may say it comes in peace, but to its prey, its arrival represents a transparent show of aggression. 📷 @scubajonjake

What if we told you that a group of gelatinous animals helps control the planet’s climate? Your disbelief would be salp-able! Salps are filter-feeding gelata related to pyrosomes that pack up plankton produce into poo pellets that precipitate into the deep, capturing carbon from the atmosphere and tucking it away in the depths of the hydrosphere. Thanks to local photographers @hiimjoe88 and @mansonfotos for the salp selfies! Joe’s first photo shows a solitary Pegea confoederata salp ready to birth the same kind of long chain that Michelle found in the second photo! The pink orbs are the salps’ guts, and these tubular animals are essentially a passing pasta strainer for plankton!

In yesterday's post—and perhaps on the beach—you met washed up "sea pickles." Introducing... *drumroll* PYROSOMES! These colonial filter-feeders invaded the coast in huge numbers last year, and they're members of a unique gelata group: the urochordates. As larvae, these animals have the beginnings of a spinal chord, making them some of the most vertebrate of the invertebrates! Photos by @mansonfotos and @oregoncoastaquarium